specimen

Auto [1993. with Expo HenK]

Modified truck, flight simulator, aquarium integrated in front windscreen, working industrial ventilator and extremely loud soundhorn, etc. Exhibited at Galerie ’93 Kunsthal, Rotterdam, NL. (temporary project)

Expo HenK started out in 1988 as an artist run space housed in De Fabriek in Delfshaven. From 1993 the Expo HenK group (Don van Basten, Peter Breevoort, Freek Drent, Ron van der Ende, Hans Eijkenboom, Roel Meelkop, Arjo Rozendaal and Joop Witteveen) produced a number of large installation type artworks in collaboration.

The name Expo HenK is an abbreviation of Expositieruimte Hakken en Kwasten (Exhibition Space Hacking and Dobbing)

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Collages [1993/94]

Paper collages from a series of studies. Never exhibited.
(collection of the artist)

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Collages [1993-97. with Freek Drent]

Collaborative designs for invitations. Printed matter.

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Huis [1993. with Expo HenK]

House : by Expo HenK Collective
Salvaged wood and window panes, steel shelving units, etc. Height: 7m.
(Caldic Art Collection / Museum Voorlinde, Wassenaar, NL)

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Interieur [1994. with Expo HenK]

Interior : by Expo HenK Collective
Salvaged wood and other materials. dim: 8 x 8 x 4.4m
(temporary project)

Tunnel [1996. with Freek Drent]

For The Happy Room  group exhibition in the Expo HenK exhibition space.
Salvaged wood, wallpaper, old maps, miniature train set, rented 'kiddy-ride' train track. dim: 4 x 5 x 3m
(temporary project)

Bar [1995. with Expo HenK]

Large collaborative installation by Expo HenK Collective.  Salvaged materials, shelving units, fridge, toilet, wax cabinet, lights, moving parts and sound, etc. dim: 7 x 4 x 3m
(collection Groninger Museum, Groningen, NL)
Photo: Hans Wilschut

Boot [1996. with Expo Henk]

Ship : by ExpoHenK Collective.  PVC inflatable. Length: 17,5m
(was a semi permanent installation in the Kunsthal, Rotterdam, NL. Scrapped)

For the Expo HenK Sign Project.  Salvaged wood, glass, light. 1,40 x1,20 x 0,60m
(collection of the artist)

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Industrieel Landschap [1993-1997. with Freek Drent]

Industrial Landscape was a long running project that started in 1993 as an idea to design chess pieces and spiralled into a collection of 16 intricate sculptures. The project focussed on industrial architecture and the artists visited many industrial sites, most notably in Romania during a three week trip. A booklet was produced under the same name as the project, which can be found in the bibliography section.
Steel, wood, salvaged materials, Romanian 'legos', a chopping block, etc.
(some of these sculptures are held in the Artoteek Rotterdam’s collection or in the artists’ collections.)

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Vuurtoren [1997/98. with Expo HenK]

Light House  was the last large Expo HenK Collective project. Concrete, bricks, mortar, steel, glass, revolving light, polyester boat. Total height: 9 meters.
(Light House  was demolished in 2015.)

Before the Bas Reliefs

“Until 1995 I had intentionally worked from a deliberate dilettante perspective. My assumption was that things must be best when tried for the first time. The problem here is that, unless you are all thumbs, doing many different things over a period will give you a level of skill whether you want it or not. Before long I was making components for sculptures that looked practically factory-made. A viewer of the work could no longer visually perceive the actions that went into making the object, so that the work had a static character. I wanted to find a way to make my skills work for me in a dynamic, open-ended way. I also wanted to work with materials that were in a different universe from hardware store materials or - perish the thought - art supplies... By exploring in depth the possibilities of a weathered, organic and inherently imperfect material like salvaged wood, I could now specialize and direct my skill in a way that the viewer would be able to trace.”