specimen

s.t. (Renault 5) [1988]

Ink drawing on paper, 24x20cm.
(collection of the artist)

Walvis (Miyamoto Musashi slaying the Whale) [1989]

2.3 x 1.4m, permanent marker on canvas, denim, rope, steel and tape.
(collection of Guus Vreeburg, Rotterdam, NL)

Construction Sketch [1989]

Felt pen on paper, 40x30cm. This was the last of three proposals for a large improvisation with scaffolding materials. The structure contains a suspended ‘theatre’, shaped like a spaceship hull. It was not realized.
These were the first proposals that would require execution by a team of builders rather than by a single artist.
(collection of the artist)

Knikkerbaan [1990]

Marble Track , steel, aluminum, rubber, electric motors and lights. Functioning marble track in a wooden box lined with aluminum. One of 44 boxes fitted to the Hotel Fantasia cabinet which was a large scale Dionysus Gallery special project.

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Bulldozer series [1992]

Shovel,  Shovel-RipperLarge Shovel-Ripper, Lacquer paint on wood board.

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Aircraft Engines of the World [1991]

9 paintings, oil on canvas, unframed, in different sizes.
The images were derived from the library book Aircraft Engines of the World. (Bouwfonds Kunstcollectie, Hoevelaken, NL, Artoteek Rotterdam, NL, private collection, Aalst, BE)
Photos: Mark Weemen

Before the Bas Reliefs

“Until 1995 I had intentionally worked from a deliberate dilettante perspective. My assumption was that things must be best when tried for the first time. The problem here is that, unless you are all thumbs, doing many different things over a period will give you a level of skill whether you want it or not. Before long I was making components for sculptures that looked practically factory-made. A viewer of the work could no longer visually perceive the actions that went into making the object, so that the work had a static character. I wanted to find a way to make my skills work for me in a dynamic, open-ended way. I also wanted to work with materials that were in a different universe from hardware store materials or - perish the thought - art supplies... By exploring in depth the possibilities of a weathered, organic and inherently imperfect material like salvaged wood, I could now specialize and direct my skill in a way that the viewer would be able to trace.”