specimen

Wand (Installatie 2) [1988]

Mixed media (wood, steel, neon etc.), 6 parts, total dimensions 10 x 2,1 x 1,5m

Wall / Installation 2 : a 10 m long by 2.1 m tall installation of six evenly spaced objects: a letter E, a section of a wooden lifeboat, a billboard with neon lettering, an ‘abstract piece of art’, a window (glassless but with a working ventilation fan), and a cupboard with wire-suspended shelves. They were all made from scavenged materials except the window, which was ordered from Hofman Maasdijk carpentry factory (where father Van der Ende works). The aim in this project was to probe the idea of ‘typologies’ within sculpture.
The installation was based on an extensive series of sketches which addressed the question: what could be 1m20 wide and 2m10 high and stand up by itself? From the hundreds of resulting options, six were selected on the criteria of visual quality, presence, diversity, appeal and challenge. The selected objects were placed close together in a row to form a wall-like obstruction which effectively cut the room in half.
The WdKA Maaskant Prize jury report states that this project was a decisive factor in awarding Ron van der Ende the prize in 1990.

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The individual elements comprising Wall .

Before the Bas Reliefs

“Until 1995 I had intentionally worked from a deliberate dilettante perspective. My assumption was that things must be best when tried for the first time. The problem here is that, unless you are all thumbs, doing many different things over a period will give you a level of skill whether you want it or not. Before long I was making components for sculptures that looked practically factory-made. A viewer of the work could no longer visually perceive the actions that went into making the object, so that the work had a static character. I wanted to find a way to make my skills work for me in a dynamic, open-ended way. I also wanted to work with materials that were in a different universe from hardware store materials or - perish the thought - art supplies... By exploring in depth the possibilities of a weathered, organic and inherently imperfect material like salvaged wood, I could now specialize and direct my skill in a way that the viewer would be able to trace.”